wpe9C.jpg (2063 bytes)wpeAA.jpg (1184 bytes)wpe9E.jpg (1469 bytes)wpe9F.jpg (1398 bytes)wpeA0.jpg (1457 bytes)wpeA1.jpg (1490 bytes)wpeA2.jpg (1451 bytes)

Business Prescriptions Radio Programs

Getting Things Done:
The Art of Stress-Free Productivity

audio.gif (369 bytes) rx10122

Getting Things Done.

I'm Kevin Pierce with a look at the art of stress-free productivity in today's Business Prescriptions...

With more and more responsibilities in our home and business lives, it becomes a greater challenge to keep things straight and get things done. Management consultant David Allen says the solution to the stress of productivity is to relax and stop thinking so hard...

"Much of the stress comes from the fact that you haven't clarified exactly what you need to do about something and exactly what it means, and put the results in a good system that you trust. And so your brain is sitting their pounding on you going, 'You still need to decide this, you still need to organize this, you still need to put this in some appropriate place,' and if you don't do that, (your brain)'s still trying to do that."

Essentially, by not making decisions, our brains are forced to keep track of what's pending...

"Your brain is a very wonderful servant, but it doesn't do that kind of stuff very well. You've actually got to come to grips with it. So, to get stuff off your mind, you actually have to think. Not a lot, but more than you think."

And from that little bit of thinking, comes an action that reduces stress...

"You have to decide, 'What does it mean? What's the action step?' And if you can't finish it right then, you need to put the results in some sort of trusted place where your brain can say, 'Ah, I've now done what I need to do on this, I've done all the thinking I can do, I've defined what I need to do, and I can't do it right now, therefore I do not have to be bothered by it.'"

David Allen is author of "Getting Things Done: The Art of Stress-Free Productivity."

For more information, check out BusinessRx.org. Business Prescriptions is produced at the College of Business at Florida Gulf Coast University.

For more information:

Book Information: Getting Things Done, Viking

audio.gif (369 bytes) rx10123

Two questions for better productivity.

I'm Kevin Pierce with the "what" and "how" of decisions in today's Business Prescriptions...

Management consultant David Allen says clearing our minds of pending decisions goes a long way to reducing stress and improving productivity. But to clear those pending decisions, requires making some basic ones....

"I've got to figure out what it is I'm trying to accomplish with this project, with this job, in this department, with my family... So this old stuff about what we've been taught about visioning and outcomes... absolutely. But we also need to do that down at the more mundane levels of our work and our life by saying, 'What do I want this meeting to accomplish? What do I want this conversation with my kids to produce?'

After deciding what you want to accomplish, comes deciding on how to do it...

"Now I've decided on the outcome that I want, how do I get from where I am to there? Is that a phone call I need to make, is that a document I need to draft, is that a conversation I need to have? Or am I waiting on something to come back from somebody else before I can move on it?

And with what and how decided, much of the internal nagging about pending decisions gets put aside...

"Just training ourselves to think about 'What's the outcome I'm after? And what would the next step that I need to take, look like to get from here to there?' If we can just train ourselves in that kind of thinking, I think it's going to advance things in terms of light years in how to thread through this world out there."

David Allen is author of "Getting Things Done: The Art of Stress-Free Productivity."

For more information, check out BusinessRx.org. Business Prescriptions is produced at the College of Business at Florida Gulf Coast University.

audio.gif (369 bytes) rx10124

Fighting to be stress-free

I'm Kevin Pierce with the martial arts of decision-making in today's Business Prescriptions...

When management consultant David Allen illustrates the importance of stress-free decision making, he heads to martial arts, where he says great force comes from great relaxation...

"The martial arts image is, I think, a very appropriate one. The reality is that the black belt is the most cooled-out person that you could fight, and they're also the most awesome. What you don't want to be is upset, distracted, over- or under-reactive, to your life and your work because then you're not fully available to be as productive as you could be."

So, to be more productive, Allen advises making decisions that will help you reduce stress...

"Get this stuff done with as little effort as possible, and as much attention as possible. So, in a sense, the more relaxed you are, the more powerful you can be, the more focused you can be, and the more attention you can give to something to really give it it's due."

In his mental-martial-arts, Allen returns to two key questions...

"You need to sit down and answer two critical questions: 'What do I now intend to do about or with this, i.e. What's the project, What's the outcome?' And, 'If I've committed to something I can't finish in one step or right now, then what's the very next action step I would need to take to get closure on that."

David Allen is author of "Getting Things Done: The Art of Stress-Free Productivity."

For more information, check out BusinessRx.org. Business Prescriptions is produced at the College of Business at Florida Gulf Coast University.

audio.gif (369 bytes) rx10125

Five steps to easier decisions.

I'm Kevin Pierce with tools for stress-free productivity in today's Business Prescriptions...

Management consultant David Allen lays out a five step plan for managing work and de-stressing your mind. Start, he says, by collecting what you need...

"First of all, you need to get stuff 'on your mind,' off your mind in raw form anyway: write it down, get an in-basket, toss all the ideas--would, should, could, need to's, ought to's, might-wanna's--into scraps of paper, but throw those scraps of paper into a bucket that doesen't have any leaks to it that you know you can come back to. That's why an in-basket is such a powerful tool."

Next, process that information...

"You may pick up the scrap of paper you wrote down last night and say, 'I'm not going to do anything that,' or 'Oh yeah, that's the phone call I need to make,' or 'Oh, that's something I need to my spouse about.' So you need to process what you collect."

Then, organize what you've collected...

"Once you've collected it, once you've processed it, then you need to park reminders of the actions you come up with when you process it, into some sort of system you trust. Because you're not going to finish everything as soon as you think of it. 'Handle things once' is really not true."

And after reviewing your plans, end by trusting your decisions...

"Everyone is making intuitive judgement calls about what to do. But I suggest if you go through the 'collect, process, organize and review' phase, then when you decide what to do out of all of that, it's more of a trust in your intuition as opposed to hoping that your intuition is right."

David Allen is author of "Getting Things Done: The Art of Stress-Free Productivity."

For more information, check out BusinessRx.org. Business Prescriptions is produced at the College of Business at Florida Gulf Coast University.

audio.gif (369 bytes) rx10126

Managing outside of work

I'm Kevin Pierce with productivity away from the job in today's Business Prescriptions...

Though management consultant David Allen makes his living consulting inside companies, he says his tools for helping people calm their minds and be more productive are just as applicable, outside the business world...

"Everyone needs an in-basket at home, they need something in transit, as well as one at work, if they work in a different place."

That figurative in-basket, Allen says, is critical for collecting things we need to make decisions on...

"Your e-mail serves as an in-basket, and so does your answering machine and voicemail. But just like you get your answering machine empty by processing what's in there, you need to process all those notes at some point."

And there are parallels between work and home...

"If you're a parent, any kid is like managing a corporation. (That's why) the kids need to 'get this:' they need to have in-baskets. Because most teachers and parents tell us kids really need to start learning this by the time they're 11 or 12, because they're already on committees and going to soccer, and have got six billion things they could do out there, and things they're starting to need to manage."

Though important, Allen says organization for making decisions is often overlooked...

"I was never taught what an in-basket is and why it's critical to get stuff out of my head so it doesn't take up more space than it deserves. And I still don't see anybody else being taught that, either."

David Allen is author of "Getting Things Done: The Art of Stress-Free Productivity."

For more information, check out BusinessRx.org. Business Prescriptions is produced at the College of Business at Florida Gulf Coast University. 

Copyright: Kevin Pierce, Inc.